Page builder test

Picture 1

started having the first thoughts of leaving South Africa in 2008. Yes, ten years ago. My company was doing OK, every year was better than the previous one, and in good spirit, we closed the shop for the Christmas holidays and went on leave. We came back and found out that the electricity has suddenly become a precious commodity, so precious, that we couldn’t have it all the time. Eskom started load shedding.

Well, it was a complete disaster. In my business (printing) deadlines are the most important. And when you market yourself as someone that never misses the deadline and get your business because of this fact, this is a complete catastrophe. We went through the process, known to all of you, but completely unthinkable to anybody in Europe that cost us money, clients, turnover, and mostly nerves. We had to pay for huge generator which was eating hundreds of liters of oil by the minute, had to organize hundreds of canisters to transfer this oil, had to extend shifts so we can work once the power gets back, had to replace computer boards on our machines regularly because sometimes the power would come back, and go again when we don’t expect it to happen. And so on, and so on. But, we got used to it. Like a frog in the boiling water. It just got warmer, and we were cooking, but, what the hell, we were still moving.

Picture 1

started having the first thoughts of leaving South Africa in 2008. Yes, ten years ago. My company was doing OK, every year was better than the previous one, and in good spirit, we closed the shop for the Christmas holidays and went on leave. We came back and found out that the electricity has suddenly become a precious commodity, so precious, that we couldn’t have it all the time. Eskom started load shedding.

Well, it was a complete disaster. In my business (printing) deadlines are the most important. And when you market yourself as someone that never misses the deadline and get your business because of this fact, this is a complete catastrophe. We went through the process, known to all of you, but completely unthinkable to anybody in Europe that cost us money, clients, turnover, and mostly nerves. We had to pay for huge generator which was eating hundreds of liters of oil by the minute, had to organize hundreds of canisters to transfer this oil, had to extend shifts so we can work once the power gets back, had to replace computer boards on our machines regularly because sometimes the power would come back, and go again when we don’t expect it to happen. And so on, and so on. But, we got used to it. Like a frog in the boiling water. It just got warmer, and we were cooking, but, what the hell, we were still moving.

Picture 1

started having the first thoughts of leaving South Africa in 2008. Yes, ten years ago. My company was doing OK, every year was better than the previous one, and in good spirit, we closed the shop for the Christmas holidays and went on leave. We came back and found out that the electricity has suddenly become a precious commodity, so precious, that we couldn’t have it all the time. Eskom started load shedding.

Well, it was a complete disaster. In my business (printing) deadlines are the most important. And when you market yourself as someone that never misses the deadline and get your business because of this fact, this is a complete catastrophe. We went through the process, known to all of you, but completely unthinkable to anybody in Europe that cost us money, clients, turnover, and mostly nerves. We had to pay for huge generator which was eating hundreds of liters of oil by the minute, had to organize hundreds of canisters to transfer this oil, had to extend shifts so we can work once the power gets back, had to replace computer boards on our machines regularly because sometimes the power would come back, and go again when we don’t expect it to happen. And so on, and so on. But, we got used to it. Like a frog in the boiling water. It just got warmer, and we were cooking, but, what the hell, we were still moving.

Picture 1

started having the first thoughts of leaving South Africa in 2008. Yes, ten years ago. My company was doing OK, every year was better than the previous one, and in good spirit, we closed the shop for the Christmas holidays and went on leave. We came back and found out that the electricity has suddenly become a precious commodity, so precious, that we couldn’t have it all the time. Eskom started load shedding.

Well, it was a complete disaster. In my business (printing) deadlines are the most important. And when you market yourself as someone that never misses the deadline and get your business because of this fact, this is a complete catastrophe. We went through the process, known to all of you, but completely unthinkable to anybody in Europe that cost us money, clients, turnover, and mostly nerves. We had to pay for huge generator which was eating hundreds of liters of oil by the minute, had to organize hundreds of canisters to transfer this oil, had to extend shifts so we can work once the power gets back, had to replace computer boards on our machines regularly because sometimes the power would come back, and go again when we don’t expect it to happen. And so on, and so on. But, we got used to it. Like a frog in the boiling water. It just got warmer, and we were cooking, but, what the hell, we were still moving.

Picture 1

I started having the first thoughts of leaving South Africa in 2008. Yes, ten years ago. My company was doing OK, every year was better than the previous one, and in good spirit, we closed the shop for the Christmas holidays and went on leave. We came back and found out that the electricity has suddenly become a precious commodity, so precious, that we couldn’t have it all the time. Eskom started load shedding.

Well, it was a complete disaster. In my business (printing) deadlines are the most important. And when you market yourself as someone that never misses the deadline and get your business because of this fact, this is a complete catastrophe.